cinnamon, spice, fragrance

Cinnamon is the brown bark of the cinnamon tree, that, when dried, rolls into a tubular form called a quill. It’s offered in either its entire quill form (cinnamon sticks) or as floor chips or powder.

Actual cinnamon comes from Sri Lanka from where 10, 000 to 12, 000 metric tons are exported yearly. Oftentimes, both Ceylon cinnamon and Chinese cinnamon are labeled simply as cinnamon. If you would like to discover the sweeter, more elegant tasting Ceylon variety, you might have to shop in a grocery store shop.

History

The term cinnamon comes from the Greek kinnamomon. Cinnamon understands this odor and taste from a chemical compound known as cinnamaldehyde. Additionally it is mentioned in Chinese writings as far back as 2800 BC.

In Ancient Egypt and Rome, cinnamon was used in the embalming procedure. The Egyptians also used it medicinally and as a flavoring in food and drinks. In the Middle Ages, cinnamon was only affordable by the elite of society. Someone ‘s social status could be decided by the amount of spices he possessed.

Health Benefits

Though most commonly used as a spice, cinnamon has many health benefits. Studies have shown that only 1/2 teaspoons every day can lower LDL cholesterol. Other studies suggest that it could have a regulatory effect on blood glucose, which makes it especially beneficial for those who have Type 2 diabetes. It has also been proven to prevent some types of yeast infections.

Additionally, it offers an anti-clotting impact on the blood. Researchers found that in only 1 week cinnamon was successful in reducing arthritic pain and demonstrated that cinnamon decreased the spread of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells. Additionally, it inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, which makes it a natural food preservative.

Regular use of cinnamon also boosts cognitive functioning and memory and fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices. It’s a fantastic source of manganese, iron, fiber, and calcium. The combination of fiber and calcium can help remove bile, which prevents damage to colon cells. This helps prevent colon cancer. Fiber also can assist with the relief of constipation and irritable bowel syndrome.

Cinnamon has antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic properties. It’s been used in combating vaginal yeast infections, oral yeast infections, stomach ulcers and head lice. Its curative ability comes from three primary types of elements in the essential oils found in its bark.

In addition to its active elements in its essential oils and its nutrient composition, cinnamon has also been appreciated in energy-based medical systems, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine, for its warming qualities. It has also been used to offer relief when confronted with the beginning of a cold or flu, especially when mixed in a tea with some fresh ginger.

Recipes

Toast with a healthy twist

Drizzle flax seed oil on whole wheat toast and sprinkle with cinnamon and honey.

Mexican style

Adding ground cinnamon to black beans to be utilised in burritos or nachos provides them a distinctively delicious taste.

Middle Eastern inspired meal

Sauté lamb with eggplant, raisins and cinnamon sticks to make a special flavour.

Special drink

Simmer cinnamon sticks with soymilk and honey for a deliciously warming drink.

Advice

Add ground cinnamon when preparing curries.

Conclusion

Although cinnamon is healthy, just like spices don’t believe ” a bit is good, a lot is better. ” Cinnamon is known to be poisonous in large doses. Nor does it replace needed drugs. Store cinnamon in a tightly sealed glass container in a cool, dark, and dry location. A sweet odor indicates it remains fresh.